Is There A Need For A Citizenship Education Course?

EDUCATION COURSE

Facts. Wider than a course of study of religions or a course of philosophy, without completely replacing the existing courses of religion, the content of the courses of education for the citizenship proposed by the minister of the Teaching Joëlle Milquet to the pupils Secondary education of official education does not yet seem to be final.

Many questions remain about their organization:  Who will dispense them? What need?What should they consist of? Should they substitute for religious courses? A survey of the main stakeholders and field observers, with unanimity: Citizenship education must be transversal.

Mohamed Azaitraoui is a Muslim councilor in the IPPJ of Wauthier-Braine and Braine-le-Château for young people from 14 to 18 years old. ”  The citizenship course must be present, but not necessarily to the detriment of an hour of religion,” he said. “It is essential to adapt our philosophy of life to the country in which we live, and I aim at citizenship as part of my courses by adapting my discourse to good living together. How to live together in a country that cultivates this linguistic and cultural diversity, all the professors of religion are able to tackle this problematic, without doing the work of proselytism, aiming for neutrality so as not to risk falling into extremes. I’m like everyone else, but I do not look like anyone, “said Mohamed Azaitraoui, ” That is to say, that my religion concerns only me.” Secularism, seen as the neutrality of public space, does not prevent me from being a Muslim and does not challenge my religious principles, insofar as I do not impose this religion on others  . ” He insisted: ”  If a citizenship education course is introduced, as a common core and therefore no intersection of all visions, it will be up to the organizing authority to prepare it, so that its content is respected by the All the professors who will deliver it  “.

”  Yes to civic education, not to the suppression of the course of religion,  ” declared Tommy Scholtes, press officer of the Belgian Episcopal Conference. ”  Of course, young people need to be trained in citizenship, but this can be done through training, in schools, in the family, in youth movements. Needless to say. Knowing the great philosophical or religious currents is also part of the training of every young citizen, without dogmatism and blinders. But young people also have the right to deepen the religious knowledge of their family. By surpassing the traditional Christian values ​​called freedom, fraternity, equality! The Bible has immeasurable riches of love, conviviality, respect, And opens up to a transcendence with God, which, if well lived, is at the service of humanity, without any ideological confinement. All professors can contribute to citizenship, and a part can be given to the course of religion. Let us not be naive though. Are not the advocates of the citizenship course more concerned with a reduction in the courses of religion than with civic education? Let us not forget either the role of inspectors of religious courses that can avoid undesirable drifts. He concludes: “And that public education does not forget that Christian values ​​are intrinsically linked to respect and tolerance, without any exclusivity. I think that the professors of history or religion can give such lessons,

The chief rabbi of Brussels Albert Guigui considers that “to  delete one hour of religion to replace it by one hour of citizenship would be a fatal error. The religious course offered in the official establishments allows children belonging to the various religions recognized in Belgium to have roots, experience and memory. Deleting this course totally or partially means endangering our children, who, because of their lack of roots, are likely to become easy prey for all the ill-intentioned people who seek to recruit them,  “he said. ”  The great advantage of a course of religion given in the public school is to enable supervision and supervision by the heads of establishments and, on the other hand, by the inspectors of the courses Of religion. The abolition of these courses may throw a part of our children into educational structures without any supervision or control. Religious courses in official schools therefore constitute safeguards against any form of radicalism. Indeed, the new curricula provide for competency references specific to each course, but also competences common to all courses of religion and morals, with legal possibility of joint activities between these courses. For the common part, the project proposes to develop three axes: philosophical questioning, interconvictional dialogue and a reflection on the foundations of citizen engagement. In a multiconvictional society, to offer, in the school, both a space of recognition of multiple identities and a place of dialogue between them, It is to contribute to the construction of each person and to participate in social cohesion. In order to do this, rather than establishing a citizenship course, it is important to develop the ability to be questioned and to question the representations of the other in respectful encounters. Such an approach finds as much its meaning in official education, adhering to neutrality, as in denominational education. As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens.  The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . In order to do this, rather than establishing a citizenship course, it is important to develop the ability to be questioned and to question the representations of the other in respectful encounters. Such an approach finds as much its meaning in official education, adhering to neutrality, as in denominational education. As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . In order to do this, rather than establishing a citizenship course, it is important to develop the ability to be questioned and to question the representations of the other in respectful encounters. Such an approach finds as much its meaning in official education, adhering to neutrality, as in denominational education. As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . It is important to develop the ability to let oneself be questioned and to question the representations of the other in respectful encounters. Such an approach finds as much its meaning in official education, adhering to neutrality, as in denominational education. As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . It is important to develop the ability to let oneself be questioned and to question the representations of the other in respectful encounters. Such an approach finds as much its meaning in official education, adhering to neutrality, as in denominational education. As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings . As for the citizenship course, it should not be given at any given time in the schedule. All courses must contribute to making our children exemplary citizens. The citizenship course must be an integral part of all courses given at the school, including during recess and school outings .

”  Citizenship education is a set of knowledge and skills (know-how / know-how),  ” says Ina Van Looy , Director of the Center for Citizenship Education (CCLJ), ”  but only one course Does not make our children citizens, and the school must not be alone in the acquisition and development of this knowledge. It is the whole society that must commit to allow all children to feel citizens and grow as equal citizens.Our priority should be equality at / in / in front of school. If, however, a new course were to enter the school, as early as the last year of nursery education, I would propose philosophy with the children. It promotes expression, listening, the elaboration of a personal opinion, The critical view, the appropriation of the culture of the debate of ideas … in short, the indispensable civic competences. As a secular, I consider that religion belongs to the private sphere, it remains at home.But this does not mean that it is not tackled at school, on the contrary it must be taught, whether in history, philosophy, French, but not in a course of religion as a That such “.

 The news is hurting. It affects us in our deepest values  , “says Benoît Van der Meerschen , the deputy secretary general of the Laïque Action Center. ”  It shows how the stakes of living together are more than ever unavoidable and call for concrete and thoughtful responses from the Politics.In this sense, although it will obviously not solve everything, the time for a “common course of education for citizenship” provided for in the Community Policy Statement, even if it may be insufficient, is a step forward. However, as has already been demonstrated by various constitutional experts, The provisions of the positive law of the French Community which now make these courses of religion courses as non-denominational moral compulsory (whether for an hour or two) are contrary to Article 2 of the First Protocol to the European Convention For the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms. The elimination of the compulsory nature of so-called “philosophical” courses is therefore a legal obligation and not a mere political option.Hence, is it not time today to finally have courageous politicians who dare to touch the old tattered pomp of the school pact? And who, in place of supposedly philosophical courses, decided to introduce a new common course which would address all the pupils without crumpling, And would focus on what unites and not on what divides?  There is an urgency, let us return to school its role: that of being a major tool of emancipation, a lever that allows precisely the construction of citizenship which combines differences without opposing them “.

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